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Tag: Sarah Ruhl

Emily Anderson (left) and Skylar Gudasz star as Orlando and Sasha in Orlando by Sarah Ruhl

Sarah Ruhl’s Orlando at Manbites Dog Is Comedic, Queer, and Contemplative

In the Russian tradition of Stanislavski, the actor says, “I will tell you a story about me.” In the German tradition of Brecht, the actor says, “I will tell you a story about them.” In the Vietnamese tradition, the actor says, “You and I will tell each other a story about all of us.” From… Read More ›

Emily Anderson (left) and Skylar Gudasz star as Orlando and Sasha in Orlando by Sarah Ruhl

Orlando at Manbites Dog Bends Genders Like Gumby

One of the reasons classic literature and drama exists is because it works on a number of different levels; and each time you read/watch/visualize/experience that classic piece, you are able to see yet another aspect of it that you might have missed previously. Virginia Woolf is one of those masterful writers who not only writes… Read More ›

"Dead Man's Cell Phone" concludes its three-week run on Feb. 2-5 on Raleigh Little Theatre's second stage

Dial Up ACL and RLT’s Pixilated Production of Sarah Ruhl’s “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” for Laughs

Actors Comedy Lab and Raleigh Little Theatre have a sure cure for the mid-winter blahs. Triangle theatergoers dial can dial up ACL and RLT‘s pixilated production of “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” for laughs. The show sags in some places, but cast members really sink their teeth into their juicy roles.

"Dead Man's Cell Phone" will run Jan. 20-22 and 26-29 and Feb. 2-5 on Raleigh Little Theatre's second stage

“Dead Man’s Cell Phone” Is an Offbeat 2007 Comedy

“Cell phones, iPods, wireless computers will change people in ways we don’t even understand,” playwright Sarah Ruhl [says]. “We’re less connected to the present. No one is where they are. There’s absolutely no reason to talk to a stranger anymore — you connect to people you already know. But how well do you know them? Because you never see them — you just talk to them. I find that terrifying.”

Katie Paxton as Mrs. Daldry and Kelsey Didion as Mrs. Givings discover the joy of sex with the newly invented vibrator (photos by Jon Gardiner)

Good Vibrations: PlayMakers’ “In the Next Room” Hits the G-Spot — When “G” Stands for Guffaw

“In the Next Room (or the vibrator play)” is an inspired marriage of a vintage Victorian melodrama and a contemporary British sex farce. This R-rated presentation, which includes a short scene of male nudity, really hits the G-Spot — when “G” stands for guffaw.