Triangle Arts and Entertainment – News and Reviews Theatre Dance Music Arts

Tag: Will Eno

Manbites Dog’s Wakey, Wakey Is Absolutely Phenomenal

How odd it is for a play to begin with a character wondering if he has reached his end. Such is the case with Manbites Dog Theater’s production of Will Eno’s Wakey, Wakey — it begins with a character lying helplessly prone on the stage, uttering the words, “Is it now? I thought I had… Read More ›

The Open House at Manbites Dog stars (clockwise from top) Michael Brocki, Marcia Edmundson, J Evarts, and Matthew Hager (photo by Alan Dehmer)

Awkwardness Turns into Satisfaction at Manbites Dog’s The Open House

Upon entering Manbites Dog Theater in Durham for a performance of The Open House, one immediately notices how plain the set is: devoid of color, warmth, or complexity. When the lights rise, a half-dozen bland and awkward characters are present on stage, wearing uninteresting costumes. The lighting is one-tone. Everything is sedate and awkward. Why,… Read More ›

"Middletown" runs Oct. 6-9 and 12-15 (image by Bethany Bash)

Will Eno’s 2010 Dramedy “Middletown” Looks at Small-Town Life, Circa 2010, with a Gimlet Eye

“Middletown’s” residents may be more flamboyant than their ancestors in Grover’s Corners, NH or the Spoon River region of Illinois, but the small-town lives that playwright Will Eno samples for “Middletown” are a fairly predictable cross-section of contemporary sitcom characters.

"Middletown" opens Sept. 29th (image by Bethany Bash)

Will Eno’s “Middletown” Is a Deeply Moving and Profoundly Comic Look at Small-Town Life

Welcome to “Middletown.” We’ve all been there. Life is always more complicated than it appears, and beneath the ordinary lies something epic, elusive, and mysterious.

"Oh, the Humanity and Other Exclamations" ends Dec. 18th

“Oh, the Humanity and Other Exclamations” Wallows in Existential Angst

Various and sundry vividly drawn 21st century characters perform a verbal striptease for the audience’s amusement. They lay bare their souls – often in very public places — by simultaneously giving voice to their uncensored internal monologues as well as their much more circumspect external monologues. The only problem is, some of these characters wear out their welcome long before their sketches are over.