Triangle Arts and Entertainment – News and Reviews Theatre Dance Music Arts

Fairy Fun

Vanessa Rumaz Boyd began drawing fairies for fun, and now she has used her skills as a graphic designer (she is the founder of pikaboodesign.com) to make them accessible to others. Five fairies have been created, each one growing more intricate in detail and design. Marostica, her first fairy, was originally designed for a friend planning to decorate her daughter’s room with cherries. This fairy was named after Boyd’s hometown of Marostica, Italy, a Medieval village known for its cherries (as well as a life-sized chess game played with people). Other fairies include Ariadne, fairy of the underworld of Venice, Caroline, fairy of North Carolina, and a Halloween-themed fairy.

Giselle, FantaFairy of Ballet

Giselle, FantaFairy of Ballet

Giselle, Boyd’s most recent creation, is devoted to ballet and includes images from, of course, Giselle, Cinderella, Romeo and Juliet, and Coppelia, among others. Giselle “also celebrates the effort and art that supports performances, from music to lighting, to costume and scene design-all of the behind-the-scenes work that makes performances possible and sublime.” Boyd plans to donate a collage version of Giselle to the Carolina Ballet‘s Cinderella Ball silent auction.

Ariadne, the fairy of Venice, contains the Rialto bridge, Saint Mark’s Lion, The Phoenix Theater, and other images associated with the city including the carnival mask and the gondoliere. Atop her head sits the famous Saint Mark’s Square lamps. Continuing the theme of her greeting cards, which list the various figures included in each fairy and encourage viewers to find them, Boyd plans to create illustration books. The illustration books will be dediated to a particular fairy and contain clues about how to find the various images worked in to the fairy, as well as history and mythology relating to the theme of each fairy.

Sold as greeting cards, collages, and prints, the Fantafairies can be found online at www.fantafairies.com. They are also sold at the Raleigh City Museum.

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