Tarell McCrane’s “The Brothers Size” at Manbites Dog Is a Showcase for Four of the Triangle’s Finest Actors

Manbites Dog Theater’s superlative 2012-13 season-opener, the North Carolina premiere of “The Brothers Size” by Tarell Alvin McCraney, provides a showcase for four of the Triangle’s finest actors: Kashif Powell as Ogun Size; Jeremy V. Morris and J. Alphonse Nicholson (alternating) as Ogun’s prodigal, fresh-out-of-prison younger brother Oshoosi Size; and Thaddaeus Edwards as Oshoosi’s mysterious friend Elegba, who wants Oshoosi to return to their life of crime.

In “The Brothers Size,” Tarell Alvin McCraney Injects Ancient African Myths into Present-Day Louisiana

Born and raised in the impoverished Liberty City section of Miami, FL, Tarell Alvin McCraney is a prize-winning 31-year-old gay African-American actor and dramatist. His “Brother/Sister Trilogy” begins with “The Brothers Size” (2007), in which McCraney transplants elements of Yorùbá mythology from southwestern Nigeria to the Louisiana Projects.

A. Rey Pamatmat’s “Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them” Teaches Important Lessons in Tolerance

Wanda Jin plays the title role in "Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them"

The regional premiere of “Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them,” written by Filipino-American playwright A. Rey Pamatmat and jointly presented Dec. 1-17 by Manbites Dog Theater and the Duke University Department of Theater Studies, is an offbeat coming-of-age story about the plucky 12-year-old title character (played by Wanda Jin), her resourceful 16-year-old brother Kenny (Andy Chu), and Kenny’s somewhat geeky 16-year-old boyfriend Benji (Jacob W. Tobia).

“Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them” Is an Offbeat Coming-of-Age Comedy by A. Rey Pamatmat

Wanda Jin plays the title role in "Edith Can Shoot Things and Hit Them"

On its website, Manbites Dog Theater writes, “All but abandoned in the American heartland, three kids struggle to create a makeshift family. And when the outside world barges in, the only things that can protect them are love, loyalty, and marksmanship.”

“Now You See Me” Savagely Satirizes Reality TV, But Stumbles When It Gets Romantic

Neal Bell's "Now You See Me" concludes March 23-26 at Manbites Dog Theater

“Now You See Me” is a savage satire of Reality TV’s insidious invasion of the most intimate moments of its subjects’ private lives. Bell’s fictional television series, called “Final Battle,” is tailored to the viewing tastes of the type of people who stop to rubberneck at automobile accidents and airplane crashes.