The Sword of “Wit” Slices Deeply, and Margaret Edson’s 1999 Pulitzer Prize Winner Sticks with You

Wit by Margaret Edson is a tour-de-force play for a resilient and powerful actress, fleshed out with seven subordinate performers who are necessary to advance the plot. The Justice Theater Project’s cast does an excellent job of supporting their principal; and she, Rasool Jahan, fills the role completely. The story takes place during the last… Continue reading The Sword of “Wit” Slices Deeply, and Margaret Edson’s 1999 Pulitzer Prize Winner Sticks with You

Readers Go Ballistic Over “Julius Caesar” Review

My deepest apologies to Jeremy Fiebig, a fine actor and an even finer person, according to all reports. He plays the pivotal role of Cassius, the straw that stirs the drink in the assassination conspiracy in The Justice Theater Project’s current production of Julius Caesar — and he plays the part with distinction. But in… Continue reading Readers Go Ballistic Over “Julius Caesar” Review

Abridge Too Far: The Justice Theater Project Murders Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”

William Shakespeare’s plays may be Public Domain, and therefore FREE to produce — and ruthlessly abridge — without paying royalties; but they are deceptively difficult to stage successfully. Not many community theaters in the Triangle or elsewhere have the capability to pull it off or a talent pool deep enough to communicate the power and poetry in the dialogue of the Immortal Bard’s timeless tragedies. Sadly, such is the case with The Justice Theater Project’s current ill-conceived and at times horribly miscast presentation of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar.”

Chuck Davis Will Choreograph JTP’s 2012 Edition of Langston Hughes’ “Black Nativity” on Dec. 20-23

The Justice Theater Project is continuing its new Yuletide tradition of performing shows in downtown Raleigh, NC, by presenting its second annual production of “Black Nativity,” a 1961 gospel song play by Joplin, MO-born African-American poet, playwright, novelist, journalist, and political activist Langston Hughes (nee James Mercer Langston Hughes, 1902-67), on Dec. 20-23 in 340-seat Pittman Auditorium at Saint Mary’s School.